Momentary Grace

Ask me anything   Submit   "Through the years, in between life's dramas, I caught glimpses of beauty, light, and form. These insights stuck to my inner being like secrets in the universe. Life's
rambling often covered these wondrous undercurrents, but once in a while they would surface"-Stanley Mouse

jazzicated:

Photo of Miles Davis, Dave Holland and Chick Corea, performing live onstage for BBC ‘Jazz Scene’ TV show, 02 Nov – 1969
(Photo by Ronnie Scotts)

jazzicated:

Photo of Miles Davis, Dave Holland and Chick Corea, performing live onstage for BBC ‘Jazz Scene’ TV show, 02 Nov – 1969

(Photo by Ronnie Scotts)

— 2 days ago with 281 notes
rogerwilkerson:

Business Lunch - art by Bernie Fuchs

rogerwilkerson:

Business Lunch - art by Bernie Fuchs

(via notyourbatmans)

— 4 days ago with 209 notes
weandthecolor:

Modern Architecture in Korea by Design Group Bang By Min
Check out more about the modern house in Korea by Design Group Bang By Min or discover other architecture on WE AND THE COLOR.
Follow WATC on:FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestFlipboardInstagram

weandthecolor:

Modern Architecture in Korea by Design Group Bang By Min

Check out more about the modern house in Korea by Design Group Bang By Min or discover other architecture on WE AND THE COLOR.

Follow WATC on:
Facebook
Twitter
Google+
Pinterest
Flipboard
Instagram

— 5 days ago with 171 notes
themaninthegreenshirt:

Scott LaFaro (April 3, 1936 – July 6, 1961) was an influential American jazz double bassist, best known for his seminal work with the Bill Evans Trio.
LaFaro died in an auto-mobile accident in the summer of 1961 in Flint, New York, four days after accompanying Stan Getz at the Newport Jazz Festival. His death came just ten days after recording two live albums with the Bill Evans Trio, Sunday at the Village Vanguard and Waltz for Debby, albums considered among the finest live jazz recordings.
LaFaro’s death took an enormous emotional toll on Bill Evans, who was, according to drummer Paul Motian, “numb with grief,” “in a state of shock,” and “like a ghost” after LaFaro’s death. Evans, according to Motian, would play “I Loves You Porgy”, a song with which he and LaFaro became synonymous, almost obsessively, but always as a solo piece. Evans also went on hiatus after LaFaro’s death for a period of several months. Many believe that Evans never fully recovered from the loss.

LaFaro’s death has to be one of Jazz’s greatest tragedy’s…right up there with Clifford Brown and Eric Dolphy.

themaninthegreenshirt:

Scott LaFaro (April 3, 1936 – July 6, 1961) was an influential American jazz double bassist, best known for his seminal work with the Bill Evans Trio.

LaFaro died in an auto-mobile accident in the summer of 1961 in Flint, New York, four days after accompanying Stan Getz at the Newport Jazz Festival. His death came just ten days after recording two live albums with the Bill Evans Trio, Sunday at the Village Vanguard and Waltz for Debby, albums considered among the finest live jazz recordings.

LaFaro’s death took an enormous emotional toll on Bill Evans, who was, according to drummer Paul Motian, “numb with grief,” “in a state of shock,” and “like a ghost” after LaFaro’s death. Evans, according to Motian, would play “I Loves You Porgy”, a song with which he and LaFaro became synonymous, almost obsessively, but always as a solo piece. Evans also went on hiatus after LaFaro’s death for a period of several months. Many believe that Evans never fully recovered from the loss.

LaFaro’s death has to be one of Jazz’s greatest tragedy’s…right up there with Clifford Brown and Eric Dolphy.

— 5 days ago with 26 notes
theodorafitzgerald:

Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not, 1945.

theodorafitzgerald:

Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not, 1945.

(via fybombshells)

— 5 days ago with 1701 notes